Central Lincolnshire Local Plan Review - Proposed Submission Local Plan

Proposed Submission Local Plan

12 SUEs, Regeneration Areas and Opportunity Areas

12.0. Sustainable Urban Extensions

12.0.1 Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) form an integral part of the local plan strategy, delivering more than half of the housing requirement in the plan period. But it is not only housing that will be delivered on these SUEs – by focusing a substantial amount of growth at these locations it will also see the delivery of key infrastructure to support the growing population.

12.0.2 Urban extensions must be developed as sustainable places, coordinating the planning of residential opportunities, employment opportunities and the services and facilities that will enable residents to meet their day to day needs locally. They must be designed to integrate with the existing built and natural environment, integrate with existing communities, and maximise travel by sustainable travel modes, so that they do not result in a physically and socially segregated community. They present an opportunity to deliver a wide range of sustainable development principles that often cannot be achieved at a smaller scale.

12.0.3 The eight SUEs located around Lincoln and at Gainsborough and Sleaford were allocated in the 2017 Local Plan and substantial efforts from the Central Lincolnshire Districts and site promoters and developers has gone into making progress with these SUEs. As a result many of the SUEs have already had masterplans or broad concept plans produced for them, achieved outline permission, detailed permission or even started delivery and this progress is expected to continue.

12.0.4 Policy S68, is the overarching policy for all urban extensions with subsequent policies providing specific requirements for each SUE. In the 2017 Local Plan a requirement was included for SUEs to deliver some Gypsy and Traveller pitches.  We still consider SUEs as a suitable means to deliver Gypsy and Traveller pitches, though it is acknowledged that doing so can be challenging especially so with the increased demands of this new local plan in relation to net zero carbon. Consequently this Local Plan no longer requires any Gypsy and Traveller provision on SUEs

Policy S68: Sustainable Urban Extensions

The spatial strategy for Central Lincolnshire includes the allocation of sustainable urban extensions at Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford.

Development of an urban extension must be planned and implemented in a coordinated way, through an agreed broad concept plan that is linked to the timely delivery of key infrastructure. With the exception of inconsequential development, proposals for development within the identified extensions which come forward prior to the production of, and agreement on, a broad concept plan will be refused.

Development of a sustainable urban extension should also be drawn together and guided by a design code, consistent with the National Model Design Code and associated guidance.

Working with the Central Lincolnshire authorities and other relevant stakeholders, a broad concept plan and design code should be prepared for each urban extension (in its entirety) and should clearly evidence the support of all significant landowners: the concept plan and design code should be submitted to the Council for approval. If one or more landowners are not supportive of the concept plan and design code, it will need to be demonstrated that the development of the considerable majority of the urban extension can be delivered without their involvement. The concept plan could be submitted alongside an outline application for the urban extension.

Whilst phasing may be agreed, the local planning authority will need to be satisfied that the key aspects of the concept plan will be delivered. Therefore, to prevent the provision of appropriate infrastructure being either delayed or never materialising, appropriate safeguards will be put in place, normally through a Section 106 agreement, which ensure that specific aspects of the scheme are delivered when an appropriate trigger point is reached.

Alongside the timely delivery of necessary infrastructure, key to the sustainable delivery of the urban extensions will be the requirement to minimise the need to travel, whilst maximising sustainable transport modes. This will be achieved by locating key facilities such as schools and local shops within easy walking and cycling distance of most properties, incorporating high quality walking and cycling networks linking to the wider area, and providing access to high quality public transport services and facilities, including bus priority corridors and, where appropriate, park and ride.

In addition to the above, each new urban extension proposal must, where applicable:

  1. demonstrate availability and deliverability of the proposed scheme;
  2. provide a broad range of housing choice in terms of size and design;
  3. contribute to the provision of a wide range of local employment opportunities that offer a range of jobs in different sectors of the economy;
  4. incorporate appropriate pre-school(s), primary school(s), and a secondary school (potentially incorporating sixth-form provision), if the scale of the urban extension justifies any of these on-site, or, if not, contribute to provision offsite in order to meet the needs generated by the urban extension (subject to national regulations governing such contributions);
  5. make provision for an appropriate level of retail without having an unacceptable impact on the vitality and viability of existing retail centres;
  6. consider the Agricultural Land Classification of the site, and where higher quality agricultural land exists on one part of the site compared with another, then, if possible, utilise such land (or part of such land) for productive use, such as community orchards and allotments;
  7. demonstrate that the unnecessary sterilisation of minerals has been avoided;and
  8. demonstrate that impacts on the natural environment will be minimized through the enhancement of ecological networks and habitats by achieving net gains for biodiversity as part of extended and enhanced green infrastructure.

12.1 Lincoln Sustainable Urban Extensions

Western Growth Corridor SUE (WGC)

12.1.1 The Western Growth Corridor (WGC) is a site of approximately 390 hectares in total of which approximately 122 hectares will be developed for a mixed-use development. The WGC is situated to the west of Lincoln and is bounded by the railway to the east, the A46 bypass to the west and Skellingthorpe Road to the south. The site has a number of advantages including its proximity to the city centre (which is only 1.5 km distant), physical setting and character that provide an excellent opportunity to create a sustainable urban extension to Lincoln.

12.1.2 Key features of this development include:

  • Remediation of the former landfill site on the eastern edge of the site to be undertaken.
  • Potential for a regional leisure centre;
  • A clear approach to mitigating and managing flood risk for the site and wider area through continued partnership working with key stakeholders;
  • 3,200 homes plus 20 ha of mixed employment (B Classes) and leisure (D2 Class) opportunities;
  • Taking advantage of the close proximity to Lincoln City Centre, connecting both new residents and existing neighbourhoods such as Birchwood and Skellingthorpe to the City;
  • Provision of a range of facilities including a Local Centre providing shops, a community centre and education facilities;
  • Informal open space and other recreation uses, in addition to green infrastructure and public open space to serve future residents;
  • This is a tremendous opportunity to reclaim land and bring forward development while at the same time undertake environmental improvement of this area.

South East Quadrant SUE (SEQ) Canwick Heath

12.1.3 SEQ lies on the limestone plateau of the Lincoln Heath between the villages of Canwick and Bracebridge Heath. At its closest, the SUE is within 1 mile (1.6 km) of Lincoln City Centre, with the escarpment of the Lincoln Edge, including Lincoln’s South Common, forming an important open area between the development and the edge of the city’s existing built-up area. The SUE benefits from an adopted SPD which provides a framework for the development of the entire allocation through a Broad Concept Plan and a set of Design Codes that combine to ensure that the development exploits its close proximity to Lincoln and the City Centre through appropriate linkages whilst also forming a distinctive new community of neighbourhoods that has its own facilities including shops, schools and employment.

12.1.4 Key features of this development and the adopted SPD include:

  • Protection, and where appropriate enhancement, of existing natural and heritage and environmental assets;
  • Delivery co-ordinated with the provision of local transport infrastructure. Direct access from the Eastern Bypass will not be provided for cars;
  • A range of facilities including the development of a District Centre, a Local Centre, schools and mobility hub(s);
  • High quality character and physical identity that complements the settlements of Bracebridge Heath and Canwick;
  • Approximately 3,500 new homes by 2040 (with further potential beyond that date to deliver a total of 6,000 dwellings);
  • 7ha of flexible new employment/commercial development to provide job opportunities;
  • Structural green space will provide a range of functions including recreation, health and well-being, biodiversity and ecology and movement corridors;
  • Respect for the character, biodiversity and landscape/ townscape contribution of the South Common and adjacent Bomber Command Centre memorial, and the integrity and character of Canwick and Bracebridge Heath as distinct and separate villages.

North East Quadrant SUE (NEQ) – Greetwell Area

12.1.5 NEQ lies on the north eastern edge of Lincoln between the existing residential area of Bunkers Hill and the predominantly industrial area at Allenby Road. Sitting within the Lincoln Eastern Bypass, it forms a natural urban extension to Lincoln. At its closest, the SUE is within 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of Lincoln City Centre. The area is dominated by the former Greetwell Quarry that has been used for both quarrying and mining until relatively recently. Previous ironstone mining will present some challenges and the quarry face has been designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) on account of its geological make up, so any new development would be expected to maintain and enhance this feature.

12.1.6 In late 2015, part of the NEQ was granted outline consent for up to 500 homes with detailed permission being approved for the first phase in 2019 with development commencing on the site. With the Lincoln Eastern Bypass having been completed the remainder of the site can now come forward too.

12.1.7 Key features of this development include:

  • A distinctive new community of one or more defined neighbourhoods that have their own facilities including shops and employment;
  • Approximately 1,400 new homes and approximately 5 ha of employment land;
  • On-site primary school (two form entry);
  • A new centre serving local needs. The scale of provision of such facilities should complement rather than compete with existing centres, including the Carlton Centre;
  • Direct access from the Eastern Bypass will not be provided and the main road access points will be from Greetwell Road, Carlton Boulevard and St. Augustine Road;
  • Protection, and where appropriate enhancement, of existing natural and historic environmental assets within or near the site, including appropriate management arrangements for visitor access where required. Identified assets include:
  1. Greetwell Hollow Critical Natural Assets;
  2. The geological SSSI of the Greetwell Quarry;
  3. Greetwell Quarry Local Wildlife Site; and
  4. Archaeological remains including a prehistoric triple ditch boundary, industrial archaeology associated with former ironstone mining in the area, and potential Roman remains.

South West Quadrant SUE (SWQ) – Land at Grange Farm, Hykeham

12.1.8 SWQ lies to the south west of the City of Lincoln to the south of the existing built up area of North Hykeham and to the east and north of South Hykeham Fosseway and South Hykeham Village, well located for access to Lincoln and the A46. It is close to employment opportunities at Teal Park, St Modwen Park (formerly Network 46), North Hykeham and Lincoln City Centre. Some local services are available close to parts of the development with a wider range of facilities available in the centre of North Hykeham and into the City of Lincoln.

12.1.9 SWQ will be a masterplanned SUE with an agreed Broad Concept Plan and set of design codes. It will be developed up to the existing North Hykeham settlement boundary and down to the line of the proposed North Hykeham Relief Road, whilst respecting the setting and character of South Hykeham Village. This will be achieved by ensuring a physical separation is maintained between the SUE and the village with open space running east west along the line of the existing beck.

12.1.10 Key features of this development include:

  • Approximately 5ha of additional employment land to compliment and expand the existing provision at the Boundary Lane Enterprise Park;
  • Approximately 2,000 homes (with the majority being delivered in the plan period) linked to the delivery of the North Hykeham Relief Road.
  • Any proposal to deliver early phases of the development in advance of the completion of the North Hykeham Relief Road will not prejudice the potential to deliver the bypass and must be set out in the context of appropriate transport mitigations for the SUE as a whole in terms of phasing, traffic modelling and delivery of the agreed Broad Concept Plan;
  • A Local Centre which will include an appropriate level of retail, new primary school, community facilities formal sports pitches and open space that complement and enhance existing provision.
Policy S69: Lincoln Sustainable Urban Extensions

In addition to the generic requirements for Sustainable Urban Extensions in Policy S68, development at the following strategic sites will be required to meet the following locally specific requirements:

COL/BOU/001 – Western Growth Corridor SUE (WGC) – Land at Swanpool, Fen Farm and Decoy Farm

Proposals for the WGC area, as identified on the Policies Map, should provide:

  1. Approximately 3,200 houses;
  2. Approximately 20 ha of land for mixed employment (B Use Classes) and leisure (D2 Use Class) serving the wider Lincoln area for significant local growth and inward investment of strategic importance complimentary to that on the adjacent Lincoln Science and Innovation Park;
  3. A distinctive place to live that has its own identity and respects its local surroundings including key views and vistas of and from Lincoln Cathedral and the historic core of the City and the setting of Decoy Farm scheduled monument and Hartsholme Registered Park;
  4. Comprehensive solutions to drainage and flood risk, guided by an agreed flood risk assessment and water management plan;
  5. A direct route incorporating priority for public transport linking Skellingthorpe Road through to the city centre via the Beevor Street area with connection onto the A46 if required;
  6. Transport infrastructure, such as measures to encourage walking, cycling and use of public transport (which might include park and ride facilities) in order to maximise opportunities for sustainable modes of travel, in line with the aims of the Lincoln Integrated Transport Strategy;
  7. A wide range of community facilities including a new Local Centre;
  8. A wide range of open space, recreation and leisure uses, together with consideration of the provision of a regional leisure complex;
  9. A development that maximises the opportunities for low carbon and sustainable design including, if feasible, use of the heat from the Energy from Waste plant at North Hykeham;
  10. Comprehensive solutions to reclaim and remediate the former tip on the eastern part of the site; and
  11. Improved linkages, enhancement and support of green wedges and other green infrastructure.  As this SUE is within or includes an area of Biodiversity Opportunity proposals on this site should incorporate the relevant Principles for Development within Biodiversity Opportunity Areas set out in Appendix 4

NK/CAN/003 – South East Quadrant SUE (SEQ) – Land at Canwick Heath

Proposals for the SEQ area, as identified on the Policies Map, and which form part of the adopted Broad Concept Plan and Design Code SPD (2020) should provide:

  1. Approximately 6,000 houses in total, of which around 3,500 anticipated to be delivered within the plan period to 2040;
  2. A distinctive place to live that has its own character and physical identity and respects its local surroundings, including key views and vistas of and from Lincoln Cathedral and the historic core of the City, and across the Witham Valley including views of Lincoln from Heighington Road. It will contain different character areas and will have regard to the need to provide appropriate landscape setting for the existing villages of Bracebridge Heath and Canwick, together with the open area of South Common to the north;
  3. A development that protects and enhances the existing important open spaces within and adjacent to the site, as shown on an agreed concept plan, providing an appropriate buffer zone between the South Common and the International Bomber Command Centre memorial and the development;
  4. Extension of the existing green infrastructure network into multi-functional movement networks linking land uses, facilities and amenities which avoids the coalescence of the new community with Bracebridge Heath and Canwick villages;
  5. Transport infrastructure, such as measures to encourage walking, cycling and use of public transport (which might include park and ride facilities or mobility hubs) in order to maximise opportunities for sustainable modes of travel, in line with the aims of the Lincoln Integrated Transport Strategy (2020);
  6. Strong connectivity within the development and to the City Centre and adjacent communities through high quality, safe and effective pedestrian and cycling links;
  7. Introduction of bus priority measures from the site to the City Centre, which could be achieved through technological and/or physical infrastructure measures;
  8. No direct access onto the Lincoln Eastern Bypass for motor vehicles and does not prejudice its dualling, with the main road access points from the existing A15, the B1188 and B1131;
  9. A wide range of community / social facilities including a new District Centre which will provide shops, a community centre, and other uses such as a health centre, post office, banking facilities and places of worship, located towards the east of the SUE adjacent to Canwick Avenue;
  10. Development of a Local Centre towards the west of the SUE, close to and complementing the facilities of Bracebridge Heath;
  11. Approximately 7ha of land to provide a wide range of flexible employment opportunities (any job creating Use Classes), provided on-site at appropriate location(s) serving local employment needs to be agreed with the local planning authority;
  12. Development to take account of the relationship between the site and the Lincoln Eastern Bypass, including the provision of gateway features at key access points as well as ensuring that proposed residents are protected from noise, drainage and air quality issues that may be associated with the bypass; and
  13. Improved linkages, enhancement and support of green wedges and other green infrastructure.  As this SUE is within or includes an area of Biodiversity Opportunity proposals on this site should incorporate the relevant Principles for Development within Biodiversity Opportunity Areas set out in Appendix 4

COL/ABB/001 – North East Quadrant SUE (NEQ) – Land at the Greetwell Area

Proposals for the NEQ area, as identified on the Policies Map, should provide:

  1. Approximately 1,400 dwellings;
  2. A distinctive place to live that has its own identity and respects its local surroundings including protecting and creating view corridors of and from Lincoln Cathedral and other important buildings on the north escarpment that are integrated into the development as a contribution to its identity and form part of the design context;
  3. Development that protects and enhances the existing important open spaces within and adjacent to the site (including Greetwell Hollow) or provides adequate compensatory open space for any loss and which provides an appropriate buffer zone between the development and Greetwell Hollow and satisfactorily addresses access and any visitor management issues arising from the development;
  4. Development that protects and enhances the setting of the designated heritage assets at Greetwell and the designated SSSI at Greetwell Quarry and which ensures where practicable that the archaeology of ironstone mining is retained with appropriate interpretive material on site;
  5. Development which addresses the geotechnical issues such as ground stability and mining voids relating to the site and its development;
  6. Transport infrastructure, such as measures to encourage walking, cycling and use of public transport (which might include park and ride facilities) in order to maximise opportunities for sustainable modes of travel, in line with the aims of the Lincoln Integrated Transport Strategy;
  7. High quality, safe and effective pedestrian and cycling links both within and adjoining the development, including links to the National Cycle Route 1 and Sustrans Local Routes;
  8. No direct access onto the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and does not prejudice its dualling;
  9. Make provision for an access point to the south via a new junction onto the improved Greetwell Road and to the north via accesses onto Carlton Boulevard and St Augustine Road;
  10. A range of community / social facilities including a local centre that complements and does not compete with the nearby Carlton Centre;
  11. Approximately 5 ha of land to provide a wide range of flexible employment opportunities (any job creating Use Classes), provided on-site at appropriate location(s) serving local needs to be agreed with the local planning authority;
  12. Development to ensure that proposed residents are protected from noise, drainage and air quality issues that may be associated with the Lincoln Eastern Bypass; and
  13. Improved linkages, enhancement and support of green wedges and other green infrastructure.  As this SUE is within or includes an area of Biodiversity Opportunity proposals on this site should incorporate the relevant Principles for Development within Biodiversity Opportunity Areas set out in Appendix 4

NK/NHYK/001 – South West Quadrant SUE (SWQ) – Land at Grange Farm, Hykeham

Proposals for the SWQ area, as identified on the Policies Map, should provide:

  1. Approximately 2,000 dwellings;
  2. A distinctive place to live that has its own identity and respects its local surroundings while providing a distinctive gateway into the City with high quality urban design standards;
  3. A development that protects and enhances the existing important open spaces within and adjacent to the site and extends the existing green infrastructure into multi-functional movement networks linking land uses, facilities and amenities including the protection of the setting and identity of South Hykeham village.  As this SUE is within or includes an area of Biodiversity Opportunity proposals on this site should incorporate the relevant Principles for Development within Biodiversity Opportunity Areas set out in Appendix 4;
  4. A primary access road will connect to Meadow Lane to the north east through the site to Boundary Lane to the south.  No direct access to the North Hykeham Relief Road for motor vehicles will be permitted other than the proposed junction with Boundary Lane to the immediate south of the SUE.  As the development progresses it will be informed by the transport assessment, traffic modelling and mitigations in line with the agreed Broad Concept Plan;
  5. Transport infrastructure, such as measures to encourage walking, cycling and use of public transport (which might include mobility hub facilities) in order to maximise opportunities for sustainable modes of travel, in line with the aims of the Lincoln Integrated Transport Strategy;
  6. A wide range of community facilities within a local centre;
  7. Approximately 5 ha of land for employment (B and E Use Classes) expanding the Boundary Lane Enterprise Park linking with Roman Way; and
  8. Undertake a detailed odour assessment to demonstrate no adverse impact on future residents.

12.2 Gainsborough Sustainable Urban Extensions

12.2.1 In addition to development within the existing built up area, two large scale Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) have been identified for the long term sustainable growth of Gainsborough.

12.2.2 These SUEs (Southern and Northern) will commence delivery in the plan period and continue to deliver throughout the plan period. A third site (Eastern) is identified as a ‘broad location’ for future growth post 2040, but is not expected to commence within the plan period.

12.2.3 The following policy provides further site detail and requirements for development within the SUEs.

Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood SUE

12.2.4 This area of land is south of the existing built up area of the town. Outline planning consent for development of this SUE was granted in 2011 and reserved matters for phase one was approved in 2020 with work having started on this site.

12.2.5 The works being undertaken include the provision of key infrastructure which will open up subsequent phases of the site.

Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood SUE

12.2.6 This area is to the north of Gainsborough, and received outline planning permission in September 2020.

Policy S70: Gainsborough Sustainable Urban Extensions

In addition to the generic requirements for SUEs in Policy S68, development will be required to meet the following specific requirements:

WL/GAIN/015 – Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood SUE

The Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood SUE, as identified on the Policies Map, is allocated for approximately 2,500 dwellings.

Development of this SUE is likely to come forward in accordance with the planning consents issued. However, should an alternative permission be sought for the site then in addition to the generic requirements for SUEs in Policy S68, development will be required to meet the following specific requirements:

  1. Approximately 4ha of land for employment (E(g)/B1 Use Classes) to accommodate uses such as small offices, start-up business premises;
  2. Open Space and ‘green corridors’ to integrate the development with the surrounding countryside and woodland to enhance connectivity and reduce habitat fragmentation of Warren Wood, Lee Wood and Bass/Park Springs Wood Ancient Woodlands while also avoiding or mitigating any risk of wildlife disturbance;
  3. As this SUE is within or includes an area of Biodiversity Opportunity proposals on this site should incorporate the relevant Principles for Development within Biodiversity Opportunity Areas set out in Appendix 4; and
  4. A new Local Centre of an appropriate scale, providing for retail, services and community uses to support the new community.

WL/GAIN/001 – Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood SUE

The Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood SUE, as identified on the Policies Map, is allocated for approximately 2,500 dwellings. In addition to the generic requirements for SUEs in Policy S68, development will be required to meet the following specific requirements:

  1. Approximately 7ha of land for employment (E(g)/B1 Use Classes). Employment premises provided must include start-up and small business premises;
  2. Open Space and ‘green corridors’ to integrate the development with the surrounding countryside and woodland to enhance connectivity and reduce habitat fragmentation of Blybro Spring Woods, Birch Woods and Wharton Woods Ancient Woodlands while also avoiding or mitigating any risk of wildlife disturbance;
  3. As this SUE is within or includes an area of Biodiversity Opportunity proposals on this site should incorporate the relevant Principles for Development within Biodiversity Opportunity Areas set out in Appendix 4; and
  4. A new Local Centre of an appropriate scale, providing for retail, services and community uses of a local nature.

12.3 Sleaford Sustainable Urban Extensions

12.3.1 Sleaford is identified to accommodate around 12% of Central Lincolnshire’s growth in new homes and employment land over the plan period. Most of the growth will be focused in two large scale Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) to the existing built up area of Sleaford, known as Sleaford South Quadrant (now known as Handley Chase) and Sleaford West Quadrant that can be masterplanned with appropriate infrastructure, a range of facilities and fully integrated with Sleaford.

Sleaford South Quadrant (Handley Chase)

12.3.2 Handley Chase will be a natural expansion to the main built up area to the South of the town and should be fully integrated with existing communities and provide for much needed services in this part of Sleaford. Whilst the site is not considered to be appropriate for large scale employment uses due to impacts on the highway network, it has the potential for small scale employment workspace.

Sleaford West Quadrant

12.3.3 Sleaford West Quadrant is located west of the town in close proximity to the A15. The site offers an opportunity to diversify the existing employment offer of the town through the provision of high quality employment integrated into an attractive residential environment, benefitting from a prominent position and access to the A15. The development should include a minimum of 3 ha of employment land adjacent to the A15 targeted towards knowledge intensive enterprise (E(g) use class). This will add to the diversity of employment opportunities available in the town. It will also accommodate land for a new health care facilities and secondary school facility to meet the educational needs of Sleaford’s growing population.

Policy S71: Sleaford Sustainable Urban Extensions

The growth and regeneration of the Sleaford area will be delivered through a co-ordinated and sustainable approach to planning and development, linking housing and economic growth with infrastructure improvements, whilst protecting and enhancing Sleaford’s natural environment, heritage assets and local distinctiveness.

In addition to the generic requirements for Sustainable Urban Extensions in Policy S68, development at the following strategic sites will be required to meet the following specific requirements:

NK/SLEA/014 – Sleaford South Quadrant SUE (Handley Chase)

Development at Handley Chase, as identified on the Policies Map, should result in the creation of a comprehensively planned, new sustainable neighbourhood to the South of Sleaford, comprising around 1,450 dwellings. The first phase of development should take place on the land immediately adjoining the existing built up area of Sleaford and include the provision of the new Local Centre.

Development of this SUE is likely to come forward in accordance with the outline planning permission granted for the site in 2015. However, should an alternative permission be sought for the site, then in addition to the requirements for SUEs in Policy S68, proposals for this area should:

  1. deliver a new Local Centre of a sufficient scale to meet the day-to-day needs of the Sleaford South new community and nearby residents, and to include:
    1. a community centre;
    2. retail units;
    3. a public house;
    4. a care home site; and
    5. provision for small start-up offices.
  2. provide vehicular access via London Road only, but incorporate cycle and pedestrian connections into the adjoining Southfields Estate;
  3. provide appropriate transport mitigation measures, having particular regard to measures to mitigate any adverse transport impacts on Holdingham Roundabout, Silk Willoughby, Quarrington, King Edward Street and Castle Causeway, the junction between London Road and Grantham Road and minor roads linking London Road to Grantham Road;
  4. deliver an extension of a shared footpath and cycleway along London Road;
  5. maximise the opportunities associated with the proximity of the site to the Sleaford Railway Station and include measures to encourage rail travel;
  6. provide on-site a network of green infrastructure and public open space which links into the wider green infrastructure network for the Sleaford area, maximising the potential (and mitigates the impacts) associated with Moor Drain, and which achieves strong, though carefully planned, connections to Mareham Pastures Local Nature Reserve;
  7. provide on-site sports pitches, a site for a pavilion/changing facility and allotments.

NK/SLEA/015 – Sleaford West Quadrant SUE (Land to the west of Drove Lane and to the east of the A15)

Development at Sleaford West Quadrant, as identified on the Policies Map, will result in the creation of comprehensively planned, new sustainable neighbourhood to the West of Sleaford of 1,400 dwellings. The first phases of development are likely to include the provision of an appropriate, limited scale (informed by traffic modelling) of residential development served from Covel Road, Stokes Drive and St Deny’s Avenue. The provision of a new roundabout off the A15 will be required to deliver subsequent phases of the development. In addition to the requirements for SUEs in Policy S68, proposals for this area should:

  1. deliver a new local centre to meet the day-to-day needs of Sleaford West Quadrant new community and nearby residents, incorporating provision of local retail facilities, services and community uses;
  2. provide a new healthcare facility adjoining the local centre;
  3. provide approximately 3ha of mainly use class E(g) employment land including a range of premises to complement the existing employment offer in the Sleaford area;
  4. support the delivery of the Sleaford East West Leisure Link to connect the town centre to adjacent green spaces and improve connectivity, as identified in the Sleaford Masterplan;
  5. ensure access is provided via The Drove for pedestrians, cyclists, buses, existing residents and businesses, allotment holders and a limited number of new dwellings;
  6. provide, in line with the aims of the Sleaford Transport Strategy, primary vehicular access for the development via a new junction with the A15 with secondary accesses to be provided from Covel Road, Stokes Drive, St Deny’s Avenue and The Drove;
  7. prevent vehicular access to the A15 from or through the development via routes other than those set out in f and g above;
  8. provide, in line with the aims of the Sleaford Transport Strategy, appropriate transport infrastructure measures to encourage walking, cycling and use of public transport in order to maximise opportunities for sustainable modes of travel, with a particular emphasis on maximising opportunities associated with the proximity to the River Slea and connections to the Town Centre and provide appropriate mitigation of impact on the Holdingham Roundabout;
  9. provide on-site green infrastructure and public open space, which links into the wider green infrastructure network for the Sleaford area and includes multifunctional, dual use of the school playing fields;
  10. incorporate the relevant Principles for Development within Biodiversity Opportunity Areas set out in Appendix 4 as this site is within or adjacent to an area of Biodiversity Opportunity;
  11. ensure that the development is safe from flooding from the River Slea through the application of the sequential approach to inform the site layout, ensuring that vulnerable land uses are, where possible, directed to lower areas of risk or are appropriately mitigated;
  12. preserve the setting of the historic settlement of Holdingham; and
  13. incorporate a site for the provision of a secondary school facility to meet the needs of Sleaford’s growing population.

12.4 Regeneration and opportunity areas

12.4.1 There are a number of areas within Central Lincolnshire where development or redevelopment is either sought or expected and where a planning policy framework would help to ensure that the future of the site or area is sustainable. The reason for needing such a framework depends on the pressure for change and the context of each site and the inclusion of an area in this section should be seen as an in-principle support for change, providing it is consistent with the ambitions for the site.

12.4.2 Given the varying levels of uncertainty for each site and the different specific reason for wanting to manage growth in each location, some policies are more or less flexible than others. Relevant development proposals in all locations should be subject to the corresponding policy and other policies in this plan.

12.4.3 The relevant District Councils may seek to progress a masterplan, design code, or other site specific guidance.

Lincoln Regeneration and Opportunity Areas

12.4.4 There are a number of locations near to Lincoln City Centre which contribute significantly to the overall offer of the city or where there are substantial opportunities for regeneration.

Policy NS72: Lincoln Regeneration and Opportunity Areas

Development proposals that come forward within the Regeneration Opportunity Areas, as identified on the Policies Map, should take into account the following principles:

ROA1 – Tentercroft Street

Within the area identified on the Polices Map as ROA1 proposals for major development will preferably be progressed through a masterplan prior to, or alongside a planning application. Development proposals should recognise the edge of centre position of this site and proximity to the transport hub and primary shopping centre making the most of opportunities to strengthen the offer of the City Centre, whilst not undermining the role of the City Centre.

ROA2 – Waterside North/Spa Road

Within the area identified on the Polices Map as ROA2 proposals for major development will preferably be progressed through a masterplan prior to, or alongside a planning application. Particular support will be given to residential redevelopment either solely or as part of a mixed use scheme with E Class Uses or other uses that are appropriate in this edge of centre location.

Any major development proposal shall take full advantage of the opportunities afforded by the riverside frontage and provide or contribute proportionately to the upgrading of Waterside North to incorporate footway/ cycleway provision to and from the City Centre.

ROA3 – East of Canwick Road

Within the area identified on the Polices Map as ROA3 proposals for major development will preferably be progressed through a masterplan prior to, or alongside a planning application. Particular support will be given to residential redevelopment either solely or as part of a mixed use scheme with E Class Uses or other uses appropriate for the location.

Any development shall contribute proportionately to the upgrading of footway/ cycleway provision to encourage a modal shift for the short journeys to and from the City Centre.

ROA4 – Firth Road

Within the area identified on the Polices Map as ROA4 proposals for major development will preferably be progressed through a masterplan prior to, or alongside a planning application.  Particular support will be given to residential redevelopment on the site either solely or as part of a mixed use scheme with E Class Uses or other uses appropriate for the location.

Any development shall contribute proportionately to the upgrading of footway/ cycleway provision to encourage a modal shift for the short journeys to and from the City Centre.

ROA5 – High Street South Mixed Use Area

Within the area identified on the Polices Map as ROA5 development proposals for the following uses will be supported in principle:

  • Hotels or other visitor accommodation; and
  • Shops, financial and professional services, cafes and restaurants, offices, clinics, health centres and leisure uses falling under E Use Class;
  • Residential uses including dwellings, residential institutions and student accommodation;
  • Other community, leisure or recreation uses.

The above in principle support on ROA5 is subject to:

  1. The development not resulting in the area in which it is located losing its mixed use character;
  2. Major developments including, or contributing to, a mixture of uses sufficient to add to the overall vitality of the area and to create a purpose and presence extending beyond normal shopping hours;
  3. The development not harming the local environment or the amenities which occupiers of nearby properties may reasonably expect to enjoy, such as causing unacceptable levels of disturbance, noise, smell, fumes, dust, grit or other pollution, or reducing daylight, outlook or privacy to an unacceptable degree;
  4. The development not resulting in levels of traffic or on-street parking which would cause either road safety or amenity problems; and
  5. Dwelling houses or other homes not being lost to non-residential uses unless:
    1. The level of amenity available in any particular instance is already so poor that continued residential use is not desirable and there is no realistic prospect of the problem(s) being remedied; or
    2. The overall development will maintain or produce a net numerical gain in the number of dwellings on the site.

Gainsborough Regeneration and Opportunity Areas

12.4.5 The evolution and growth of Gainsborough is closely linked with the River Trent dating back to the Middle Ages. The character and appearance of the riverside area is strongly influenced by the development that took place during the Industrial Revolution.

12.4.6 The Gainsborough Riverside Conservation Area adjoins the Town Centre Conservation Area at the junction of Silver Street and Caskgate Street and forms a linear pattern along Bridge Street and Lea Road. Forming the key view from the west into the Town, the Riverside forms a dramatic, distinctive and impressive landscape.

12.4.7 Whittons Gardens were established after the introduction of Caskgate Street in the 1970’s and are sandwiched between the highway and the Trent. The space is a priority area for improvement and regeneration and as such formed part of the District Council’s successful bid for Levelling Up Funding announced in 2021. As such this area is considered to be an key part of the integrated approach to the overall renewal opportunity of the riverside.  

12.4.8 The redevelopment of the Riverside provides the opportunity to deliver high quality development which draws upon the rich industrial and historical heritage of the town. As the western anchor to the town centre, the riverside would become a destination and focal point for investment. To enhance the towns current offer, a mix of uses would be appropriate, which could include office, leisure and residential.

Policy NS73: Gainsborough Riverside Regeneration Area

ROA6 – Gainsborough Riverside

Development proposals within the Gainsborough Riverside Regeneration Area, shown on the Policies Map as ROA6, will be supported in principle.  Proposals will be viewed particularly favourably where they:

  1. Protect, enhance or restore the historic identity of the town;
  2. Strengthen the connection between the river and the town;
  3. Make the most of the riverside location enhancing;
  4. Deliver innovative design or design excellence which provides visual interest;
  5. Contribute positively to the Conservation Area;
  6. Expand leisure opportunities related to the riverside; and/or
  7. Enhance public spaces and green infrastructure.

Sleaford Regeneration and Opportunity Areas

12.4.9 There are a number of areas which present opportunities for regeneration or renewal in the Sleaford area, many of which are included in the Sleaford Masterplan. Each of these areas have the potential to contribute substantially to Sleaford’s offer.

Policy NS74: Sleaford Regeneration and Opportunity Areas

Development proposals that come forward within the Regeneration Opportunity Areas, as identified on the Policies Map, should take into account the following principles:

ROA7 – Advanta Seeds Site

Within the area identified on the Policies Map as ROA7 development proposals will be supported in principle where:

  1. It is for uses appropriate in a town centre location, potentially including mixed use development and residential development;
  2. It creates a strong physical and functional link with Southgate and the town centre;
  3. The access to the site for motorised vehicles is from a new junction with Boston Road;
  4. Pedestrian and cyclist access is provided to Southgate; and
  5. It makes a reasonable and proportionate provision for a replacement sporting facility for the existing bowls club within the development unless it can be demonstrably shown that such a facility is no longer required.

ROA8 – Former Bass Maltings Site

Within the area identified on the Policies Map as ROA8 a sensitive redevelopment of the site will be supported where it:

  1. Will preserve, enhance and secure the future of all the buildings at the former Bass Maltings complex through an appropriate residential-led mixed use scheme;
  2. Preserves and enhances the special setting of the buildings, emphasising their historic connection to the neighbouring agricultural land;
  3. Demonstrates that the proposals represent a viable use through a supporting viability assessment; and
  4. Ensures that any proposal that requires a form and scale of enabling development is fully justified having regard to the operative guidance at the time.

ROA9 – Former Hospital Buildings, Greylees

Within the area identified on the Policies Map as ROA9 a sensitive residential-led mixed use redevelopment of the site will be supported where it:

  1. Will retain and convert all the important buildings within the designated Rauceby Hospital Conservation Area and its setting including the Admin Block, all the 6 ward blocks, the nurses’ quarters and conservatory;
  2. Improves connections to the adjacent areas of Greylees through delivering pedestrian and cycle links and the upgrade of Hine Avenue;
  3. Preserves and enhances the character, setting and significance of the Rauceby Hospital Conservation Area and Grade II Listed Registered Park and Garden; and
  4. Protects and enhances existing green infrastructure within and adjacent to the site. 

RAF Scampton Opportunity Area

12.4.10 RAF Scampton originated as a First World War training aerodrome for the Royal Flying Corps and Home Defence Flight Station, but this closed within two years of the end of the First World War. It was then reactivated in the 1930s, with squadrons in action from the first day of the Second World War. As a Bomber Command airfield, Scampton was the base for 617 Squadron – “The Dambusters”.  It is the only RAF station from which three airmen were awarded the Victoria Cross, including the youngest ever recipient of the award in the RAF.  During the Cold War, Scampton was also one of only two RAF Vulcan bomber bases to pioneer rocket technologies from 1958 until 1970 through the deployment of the revolutionary ‘Blue Steel’ missile.

12.4.11 Scampton has been the home of the RAF aerobatic team the Red Arrows since 1983, except for a period between 1995 and 2000 when the base was temporarily closed.

12.4.12 The base comprises a number of military buildings, including four large aircraft hangars within a substantial wider site of about 480ha. It is located approximately 5 km north of the City of Lincoln at the top of the Lincoln Cliff, adjacent to the A15 within open countryside.

12.4.13 At the current time it is expected that the airbase will be decommissioned by the end of 2022. It is also expected that the Red Arrows will continue to use airspace over Scampton as a main practice and training space, but with their ground operations being relocated to RAF Waddington. However the final decision and timescales are yet to be finalised.

12.4.14 Scampton’s RAF heritage is deeply ingrained in the site including the buildings, streets, spaces, trees and landscaping and therefore what remains when the RAF moves out of Scampton will continue to be influenced by its military past. Beyond the site itself, the importance of the airspace above RAF Scampton is also recognised by the protection it is given in The Air Navigation (Restriction of Flying) (Royal Air Force Scampton) (Restricted Zone EG R313) Regulations 2016.

12.4.15 There is already a community at RAF Scampton and this will continue to be the case once the RAF departs. It is vital that the future of the community is well managed to ensure a sustainable future for current and future residents. Therefore this Local Plan will look to ensure that the impacts of this change are well managed to deliver the best possible outcomes for the community through future joint working between the District Council, Ministry of Defence and other involved partners, whilst also delivering value for money from the site disposal.

12.4.16 The significant presence of the RAF in Central Lincolnshire has also seen the development of a large number of businesses operating locally which specialise in defence technology, unmanned drone technology and other related fields. These industries are expected to remain locally with the continuing RAF presence even with RAF Scampton due to be closed.

12.4.17 Due to the uncertainty which surrounds the future of the base, the primary role of this policy is to safeguard the future of RAF Scampton, supporting measures that will enhance and protect the area, whilst remaining adaptive and responsive to future decisions on the disposal and development of the site.

12.4.18 Key issues include:

  • The unique and important site is considered to be of national significance in its contribution to the evolution of aviation technology from propeller to jet aircraft. One of the few remaining sites which retains many of the physical structures and original layout associated with its rich heritage and prominence in national history, including two world wars and the Cold War.
  • The continued importance of and potential ongoing need to use airspace above the site for activities related to RAF aerobatic team and potential to use the airspace for wider defence needs or commercial enterprise, and the related constraints this would have for any redevelopment or repurposing of the site – the importance of which needs to be fully understood before the site can be developed. The unique conditions at RAF Scampton could be of significant local or national importance or could offer significant commercial opportunities to boost the economy.
  • The protection, promotion and enhancement of existing heritage assets in recognition of the important role RAF Scampton has played both in terms of military and social history.
  • The isolated nature of the site and challenges in relation to integration and improved access both across the site itself and to other settlements, supporting connectivity and future sustainability.
  • The risk of fragmented and inconsistent management and maintenance of infrastructure across the site and challenges around infrastructure specification and standard affecting opportunities for future public authority adoption.
  • The prominent position at the top of the Lincoln Cliff and potential for landscape impacts from new development.
  • The sparse nature of the buildings currently on site and visual impacts from additional and different development on the site.
  • Continued support of the existing wide-range of community facilities on the base during and after the base is decommissioned.
  • The retention and development of existing employment opportunities outside of those directly related to the current RAF operations.

12.4.19 It is essential that these key challenges are carefully managed to ensure that RAF Scampton continues to contribute positively to Central Lincolnshire and to ensure the community can continue to flourish.  This will be achieved through joint working, community engagement and through the agreement of a comprehensive masterplan detailing how the site will look, feel, operate, prosper and endure.

Policy S75: RAF Scampton

RAF Scampton is identified as an opportunity area and is defined on the Policies Map as ROA10.  This policy is in place to safeguard RAF Scampton in the event that the Ministry of Defence withdraw from the site and to provide a framework to help ensure any redevelopment is sustainable and holistically planned.

The preparation of a masterplan in conjunction with, and for approval by, the District Council will be required prior to a planning application being submitted.  Major development proposals on the site not detailed in a masterplan, or any proposals that will result in a conflict between uses, safety concerns in connection with the ongoing use of the site or the airspace, or which delivers substandard development will not be supported.

Before any masterplan is developed the value of the airspace above RAF Scampton and within 5 nautical miles of its centre must be fully understood including for any ongoing need for airspace for use by The Red Arrows, for other defence needs, and for potential opportunities for commercial use of this airspace that will offer significant opportunities to boost the local or wider economy relating to the aviation industry. Any value identified for these uses of the airspace and the site itself should be incorporated in a masterplan and prioritised taking into account the identified value it presents.

The site masterplan will be expected to:

  1. Set out the layout, mix and scale of uses, including the relationship with existing uses;
  2. Establish design parameters in relation to building heights, materials, landscaping, circulation, key features and views, and the navigation and connectivity through the site
  3. Assess impacts on the landscape and views and proposed mitigation to make any impacts acceptable;
  4. Detail the delivery of an adequate amount and range of infrastructure to support the community on the site to be delivered in tandem with or ahead of development;
  5. Provide a detailed transport assessment including the delivery of sustainable transport and active travel to be incorporated in the scheme linking the new settlement with other key settlements including Lincoln, that will ensure that reliance on the private car is minimised on the site;
  6. Evaluate and fully understand the significance and character of RAF Scampton, including both its historic layout and individual buildings and structures – with proposals for the site retaining and reflecting the historic character of the site, preserving and enhancing heritage assets and their settings as part of any scheme;
  7. Demonstrate how the scheme will deliver a net zero carbon development including the offsetting of existing homes on the site;
  8. Detail the engagement that has taken place with the community and necessary infrastructure providers and how any necessary mitigation identified has been incorporated in the masterplan;
  9. Demonstrate that adequate utilities provision can be achieved to support the scale of development proposed;
  10. Identify how the scheme will integrate with the existing community;
  11. Demonstrate any ongoing Ministry of Defence use or operation at the site or in the airspace and provide a full assessment of how this use will be compatible with the proposals and will not hinder its deliverability or sustainability or result in any safety concerns.
  12. Set out details of phasing of development and infrastructure and construction management plans including assessment of the impact of the community; and
  13. Provide a clear demonstration that the proposed scheme will be deliverable and viable;
  14. Detail how the scheme will satisfy the policies of the Development Plan; and
  15. Demonstrate how the scheme will protect and enhance the natural environment and ecological networks by achieving net gains in biodiversity.

Development proposals on the site that are consistent with the approved masterplan will be supported.